plastic battery sub

Plastic powered submarines and a new type of battery power

A battery that has been developed in Japan by Sanyo.Corp that is nearly completed built from plastic. This revolutionary product has been undergoing testing in recent months, running a drone submarine made by Kawasaki’s heavy industry department. The trials have proved positive, with the submarine managing to double the battery’s previous run time from eight to sixteen hours.

An ancillary company of Sanyo.Corp APB has developed this new technology. The main difference between this cell and others in use is that the electrolytes are composed entirely of resin, unlike previous power sources for the submarine, which were li-ion batteries. The new battery is much more fire-resistant, a crucial factor on submarines, and cheaper to make.

The submarine drone has the potential to be used at great depth. Working in such marginal environments, Sanyo has had to make sure that all equipment is fully functional. It is hoped that this type of vehicle could be used in the oil extraction industry for undersea mapping and may even have military uses. At these depths, the drone is subject to enormous pressure, and the cell needs to be able to withstand these extreme forces. In trials, the plastic battery has been capable of operating safely at depths lower than three thousand meters – a very impressive performance.

The polymer battery has doubled the submarine’s operational capability, which has obvious benefits to the safety and maintenance of oil pipelines and other undersea infrastructure. And has substantial cost benefits for its potential operators.

Initial production runs have found that savings of over ninety per cent can be achieved in the manufacture of this latest cell compared to existing li-ion battery technology. This is achieved because the manufacture of the battery is far less complex than existing batteries. Sanyo is so confident about this technology that they have constructed a state-of-the-art plant to manufacture the cell in the Fukui Prefecture (Japan) by APB.

By Autumn of 2021, the battery manufacturer should be at peak capability, and Sanyo is looking at the product fully coming to market before the end of the financial year 2022.

It is believed that these cells’ manufacture will bring a significant uplift to the company’s profits and Sanyo are confident that production costs can be recouped in less than five years. A battery that has been developed in Japan by Sanyo.Corp that is nearly completed built from plastic. This revolutionary product has been undergoing testing in recent months, running a drone submarine made by Kawasaki’s heavy industry department. The trials have proved positive, with the submarine managing to double the battery’s previous run time from eight to sixteen hours.

An ancillary company of Sanyo.Corp APB has developed this new technology. The main difference between this cell and others in use is that the electrolytes are composed entirely of resin, unlike previous power sources for the submarine, which were li-ion batteries. The new battery is much more fire-resistant, a crucial factor on submarines, and cheaper to make.

The submarine drone has the potential to be used at great depth. Working in such marginal environments, Sanyo has had to make sure that all equipment is fully functional. It is hoped that this type of vehicle could be used in the oil extraction industry for undersea mapping and may even have military uses. At these depths, the drone is subject to enormous pressure, and the cell needs to be able to withstand these extreme forces. In trials, the plastic battery has been capable of operating safely at depths lower than three thousand meters – a very impressive performance.

The polymer battery has doubled the submarine’s operational capability, which has obvious benefits to the safety and maintenance of oil pipelines and other undersea infrastructure. And has substantial cost benefits for its potential operators.

Initial production runs have found that savings of over ninety per cent can be achieved in the manufacture of this latest cell compared to existing li-ion battery technology. This is achieved because the manufacture of the battery is far less complex than existing batteries. Sanyo is so confident about this technology that they have constructed a state-of-the-art plant to manufacture the cell in the Fukui Prefecture (Japan) by APB.

By Autumn of 2021, the battery manufacturer should be at peak capability, and Sanyo is looking at the product fully coming to market before the end of the financial year 2022.

It is believed that these cells’ manufacture will bring a significant uplift to the company’s profits and Sanyo are confident that production costs can be recouped in less than five years.

A product designed for one thing is used for another

Originally these plastic batteries were envisaged to help with an issue that all firms have with increasing their static power demand in factories. A more than welcome offshoot has been the capability to use them in so esoteric an item as mini-submarines.

The company behind these batteries has raised over nine billion yen (over £60 million). It has attracted significant investment from key players in both the energy sector and among electronics manufacturers and the car industry, with licences issued to help facilitate this R and D.

All Polymer Batteries (APB) Corporation aims to use these funds to produce this new generation of plastic batteries. It is believed that by the start of the year 2023, they will be able to generate the power needed to host 1 gigawatt per hour terminals. The safety of these cells, when compared to li-ion competitors, is also considered very favourable.

The significant reduction in production costs achieved in these cells, over 90% let’s not forget, is achieved by using plastic resins replacing the electrodes. Using this material makes it possible to mould the cell’s configuration, so that cell life is greatly enhanced. A more than fortunate by-product of this technological advance is the lowering of both time spent in manufacture and the finished article’s actual cost.

When creating all-polymer batteries, the liquid electrolyte and electrodes of current battery types are replaced with polymer compounds. This new technology incorporates a bipolar structure where current flows perpendicular to the electrode planes; battery cells are sheet-shaped, enabling them to be easily stacked.

Thus, the production process can be significantly speeded up and simplified, greatly reducing cost per unit and making the entire process less difficult to replicate. For those of us interested in the future of battery power, this exciting innovation from Sanyo could undoubtedly be one to watch.

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